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Sunday, December 23, 2018

086 - Early Astronomy



In this episode, part four of four on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the earliest astronomical observations and calculations in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt and their influence on ancient Greek astronomy; the various planets and star constellations found in Greek literature, as well as the origins of the Zodiac; the earliest Greek astronomical speculations of the universe found in Greek mythology (Homer and Hesiod) and in Pre-Socratic philosophy; the Pythagorean model of the universe put forward by Philolaus; and the astronomical calculations made by Oenopides and Meton

Sunday, December 9, 2018

085 - Mathematics and Early Pythagoreans



In this episode, part three of four on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories and discoveries made by Greece's earliest mathematicians, including Thales, Pythagoras, Hippasus and the early Pythagoreans, Oenopides, Hippocrates, Antiphon, Bryson, Democritus, and Theodoros

Monday, November 26, 2018

084 - Pluralists and Other Physiologoi



In this episode, part two of four on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories put forth by the Pluralist School (Anaxagoras, Empedocles, and Archelaus), as well as by various other Pre-Socratic physiologoi (aka natural philosophers) not associated with a particular school, such as Hippon and Diogenes of Apollonia, and the philosopher/medical theorist Alcmeon

Sunday, November 11, 2018

083 - Eleatics and Atomists



In this episode, part one of four on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories put forth by the Eleatic School (Parmenides, Zeno, and Melissus) and the so-called Atomists (Leucippus and Democritus)

Sunday, October 28, 2018

082 - The Leader of the Muses



In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Apollo, the god of music, poetry, prophecy, truth, healing, medicine, plague, light, and knowledge, who served as a kind of symbol for young Greek boys to emulate


Primary Sources:

Sunday, October 14, 2018

**Special Guest Episode on Classics and Race/Ethnicity w/Rebecca Futo Kennedy**

This is the second episode in a series where I converse with Classicists about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at Denison University in Granville, OH. Her primary teaching and research areas include the history of Archaic and Classical Greece, race and ethnicity in the ancient Mediterranean, and women, gender, and sexuality in antiquity. She is the author and editor of a number of books and articles, including Immigrant Women in AthensThe Routledge Handbook of Identity and the Environment in the Classical and Medieval WorldsRace and Ethnicity in the Classical World: An Anthology of Sources, and, most recently, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus. She is currently working on the reception of ancient theories of race and ethnicity in the early Smithsonian, on the way inheritance and property laws reflect Athenian understanding of ethnic identity, and on ancient theories on race and ethnicity and their contemporary complications.

In the first hour of the conversation, Dr. Kennedy and I have a lively discussion about race, ethnicity, immigration, and multiculturalism in the ancient Mediterranean. Along the way we point out many of the misconceptions that there are on these topics, and in the second hour we discuss how these misconceptions were shaped by early modern European and American political thought. In doing so, we discuss a course that Dr. Kennedy is currently teaching called Ancient Art, Modern Politics, which examines art and architecture in ancient Greece and Rome and the history of its appropriation by modern fascist, nationalist, and white supremacist movements. Along the way we talk about the theories of German art historian Johann Winckelmann, particularly his fetishization of white marble statues, the use of Classical forms at World’s Fairs to explicitly yoke antiquity to support white supremacy, Mussolini’s reconstruction of Rome and his use of the ancient Roman past in support of Fascist ideology, Hitler’s fascination with ancient Greece and his white European-centric reconstruction of history that has been erroneously perpetuated (which leads into a digression about the impact that Classicists can have on the narrative by perpetuating racist and false versions of Greek history contrary to the evidence), and finally the cooption of classical sculpture in modern white supremacist groups.

There’s quite a bit in this episode, and like reading Herodotus, our conversation had many digressions, but we always found our way back to the original question. So without further ado, here is my conversation with Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy.



Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Associate Professor of Classical Studies at Denison University

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"'Us' & 'Them' in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 1: The Problem" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 2: The Response" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster



Sunday, October 7, 2018

**Special Guest Episode on Classics and Misogyny w/Donna Zuckerberg**

This is the first episode in a series where I converse with Classicists about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, Dr Donna Zuckerberg and I talk about her role as Editor-in-Chief of Eidolon, which is an online journal for scholarly writing about Classics that isn’t formal scholarship. This leads us into a discussion about the importance of public-facing historical scholarship. More importantly, though, we discuss her new book titled “Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age", which is a study of the reception of Classics in Red Pill communities.



"A virulent strain of antifeminism is thriving online that treats women’s empowerment as a mortal threat to men and to the integrity of Western civilization. Its proponents cite ancient Greek and Latin texts to support their claims―arguing that they articulate a model of masculinity that sustained generations but is now under siege. Donna Zuckerberg dives deep into the virtual communities of the far right, where men lament their loss of power and privilege and strategize about how to reclaim them. She finds, mixed in with weightlifting tips and misogynistic vitriol, the words of the Stoics deployed to support an ideal vision of masculine life. On other sites, pickup artists quote Ovid’s Ars Amatoria to justify ignoring women’s boundaries. By appropriating the Classics, these men lend a veneer of intellectual authority and ancient wisdom to their project of patriarchal white supremacy. In defense or retaliation, feminists have also taken up the Classics online, to counter the sanctioning of violence against women. Not All Dead White Men reveals that some of the most controversial and consequential debates about the legacy of the ancients are raging not in universities but online."

Here is my conversation with Dr. Donna Zuckerberg.




***You can order Dr. Zuckerberg's book here (Harvard University Press or Amazon)***

Sunday, September 30, 2018

081 - Orphism, Omens, and Oracles



In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Orpheus and his Mysteries; the Orphic Hymns and the Orphic Theogony; the Orphic Hymn to Melinoe and her connection to the Mysteries, Hekate, and Hermes Psychopompos; the roles of omens, divination, and itinerant seers (including the mythic figures of Tiresias, Mopsus, and Chalcias, as well as historical figures like Lampon); and the roles of oracles (including the myths and cultic worship of Apollo in regard to Delphi, Python, the Pythia, the Sibyl, and Daphne, as well as the archaeological evidence, rituals, and importance of the oracles at Delphi, those in Boeotia, and those in Ionia (ex. Didyma and Claros)


Primary Sources:

Sunday, September 16, 2018

**Special Guest Episode on Roman Slavery and Gladiators w/Fiona Radford**

In this special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Fiona Radford, expert on Rome in Film and Spartacus, to discuss slavery in the ancient Roman Republic and Empire and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece (plus lots on gladiators and Spartacus!)




Show Notes from the Partial Historians

Dr Fiona Radford
Co-Host of the Partial Historians Podcast
Website: https://partialhistorians.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepartialhistorians/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/p_historians and https://twitter.com/FionaRadford1

TED-Ed Video: From slave to rebel gladiator: The life of Spartacus - Fiona Radford

Monday, September 3, 2018

080 - Hekate and Magic



In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Hekate, the goddess associated with magic, sorcery, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, crossroads, entrance-ways, ghosts, and necromancy; including her connections and/or syncretizations with Iphigenia, Artemis, Selene, the Fures, the Keres, the Semnai Theai, Empousa, Lamia, Circe, and Medea; and the "monstrous craft" of magikos in ancient Greece, including curse tablets, binding spells, love spells, potions, and amulets

Primary Sources:
Text/The Greek Magical Papyri

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

079 - Old Age, Death, and Burial



In this episode, we discuss what life was like for the elderly in ancient Greece, the liminal stage between life and death, the rituals and importance of the funeral and burial, the archaeology of the Kerameikos in Athens and its significance in our understanding of Greek funerary practices, the importance of the demosion sema and epitaphios logos in Athenian democracy, and the evolution of Greek funerary monuments from the archaic into the Hellenistic period

Thursday, August 9, 2018

078 - Healing and Medicine



In this episode, we discuss healing and medicine in the ancient Greek world by looking at Asklepios, Asklepieia, and the earliest physicians; Hippocrates, the Hippocratic School of Medicine, and the Hippocratic Corpus; and bacterial/viral diseases, mental diseases, and disabilities

Monday, July 16, 2018

077 - From Childbirth to Adolescence



In this episode, we discuss what it was was like in ancient Athens for a young girl or boy from birth to adolescence, by looking at childbirth, childhood, the various rites of passages that they must surpass on the way to becoming teenagers, the paideia education system (both Old and New) and finally the training young boys undertook in order to be accepted as a hoplite citizen warrior

Monday, June 11, 2018

076 - The Goddess of the Young



In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Artemis, the virgin goddess of the hunt, the wilderness, the moon, and the protector of the young

Primary Sources:

Sunday, June 3, 2018

**Special Guest Episode on Roman Women and Religion w/Peta Greenfield**

In this special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Peta Greenfield to compare/contrast certain aspects of Women and Religion between the ancient Greeks and Romans (highlights include Bona Dea, the Thesmophoria, the Vestal Virgins, Hestia and the hearth, women’s role in ritual weaving, the role of women in service to gods rather than goddesses, household religion, Bacchanalia, orgies, sex workers, and much more!)



Show Notes from the Partial Historians

Dr Peta Greenfield
Co-Host of the Partial Historians Podcast
Website: https://partialhistorians.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepartialhistorians/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/p_historians and https://twitter.com/peta_greenfield
TED-Ed Video: Who were the Vestal Virgins, and what was their job? - Peta Greenfield

Monday, May 21, 2018

075 - Pregnancy, Abortion, and Divorce



In this episode, we discuss the medical and philosophical writings on women’s bodies, particularly the Hippocratic Corpus and Aristotle, on the topics of menstruation, pregnancy, and the “wandering womb”; the various methods and techniques for contraception, abortion, and exposure; the legal procedure for divorces (usually due to childlessness and adultery); and the ways in which adulterers were punished in ancient Greece


Monday, April 30, 2018

074 - Marriage and Domesticity



In this episode, we discuss the legal status of women in Ancient Greece (including the dowry and the epikleros), the betrothal and marriage rituals, and the ideal of separation and seclusion for women (the evidence for and against it)

Monday, April 2, 2018

073 - The Oikos and Private Life



In this episode, we discuss the basic designs of ancient Greek homes and what type of furniture, decoration, lighting, and so forth might have been found in them; the physical and idealistic separation between the gynakeion (women's quarters) and the andron (men's quarters); the pitfalls to ancient Athens as an urban city (such as the street-side defecation), as well as the benefits (such as the gymnasia); the religious sphere of the oikos, particularly the role that Hestia's veneration played in it; and the different type of clothing, jewelry, and hairstyles one might have seen on an ancient Athenian man or woman


Primary Sources:

Sunday, March 25, 2018

072 - The Wrathful Queen



In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Hera, the queen of the heavens and wife of Zeus, and the guardian of women, marriage, childbirth, and the family unit

Sunday, March 11, 2018

**Special Guest Episode on Roman Sexuality w/Aven McMaster**

In this special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Aven McMaster of the Endless Knot to discuss love, sex, and prostitution from the Roman perspective and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece




Dr Aven McMaster
Assistant Professor of Ancient Studies at Thorneloe University at Laurentian
Co-Host of the Endless Knot Podcast
Website: http://www.alliterative.net
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alliterativeendlessknot/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AvenSarah and https://twitter.com/AvenMcMaster

*WARNING: This episode has explicit language and sexual content*

Sunday, March 4, 2018

071 - Love, Sex, and Prostitution



In this episode, we discuss Greek love and sexuality by examining the formal social institution known as pederasty; the various philosophical theories of love as described by Plato (through various speakers) in his treatise, the Symposium; the various methods in which Athenian males (and non-citizen women) were able to have sex; the depiction of nudity and genitalia in art and masturbation; the various types of female and male prostitutes; pictorial and medical evidence for the daily life of prostitutes and philosophical and comedic representation of prostitution; and the lives of several famous hetairai (Rhodopis, Thargelia, Aspasia, Phryne, and Neaira)

Primary Sources:
Text/Plato's Symposium

Sunday, February 18, 2018

070 - The Goddess of Seduction



In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Aphrodite, the goddess of beauty, love, sexual pleasure, and procreation

Recommended Sources for Further Reading:
Text/Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

069 - Slaves and Foreigners



In this episode, we discuss the notion of the barbaroi in Greek culture; the origins and philosophical theories for slavery; and the legal status and type of roles (and importance) that slaves and metics (foreign residents) had in the Athenian economy

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

068 - Travel, Trade, and Work



In this episode, we discuss the various ways in which the ancient Greeks traveled, whether it was via land or sea; the physical layout of the port of Piraeus and the commercial activity that took place there; the mining district of Thorikos and how silver was mined for coinage and how coins were struck; farming techniques and how produce/goods were sold in the agora; the various types of manufacturing workshops at Athens and how they operated; and the disdain that the elites held for the merchant and manufacturing classes

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

067 - Hephaistos and Hermes



‪In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Hephaistos (the god of fire, metalworking, and blacksmiths) and Hermes (the messenger god of trade, deceit, travelers, and borders)


Primary Sources:
Text/Homeric Hymn to Hermes