Libsyn Player

Thursday, October 8, 2020

***Special Guest Episode on Classics and White Supremacy w/Curtis Dozier***

We are taking a break from our regularly scheduled programming for another special guest episode in a series where I converse with Classicists and Ancient Historians about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Curtis Dozier, Assistant Professor of Greek and Roman Studies at Vassar CollegeHe is the producer and host of The Mirror of Antiquity, a podcast featuring classical scholars discussing the intersections of their research, the contemporary world, and their own lives. More importantly to our discussion, He is also the director of Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classicsa website devoted to documenting and responding to appropriations of Ancient Greece and Rome by hate groups online. We discuss some of the reasons how, as well as why, White Supremacists have taken to coopting Classical imagery to support their twisted world views.


Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classics (@pharosclassics) | Twitter


Related Articles:


Related Podcast Episodes:
"Special Guest Episode on Race, Antiquity, and Its Legacy w/Denise McCoskey"
"'Us' & 'Them' in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 1: The Problem" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 2: The Response" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster

Sunday, September 20, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on Race, Antiquity, and Its Legacy w/Denise McCoskey**



We are taking a break from our regularly scheduled programming for another special guest episode in a series where I converse with Classicists and Ancient Historians about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Denise Eileen McCoskey, Professor of Classics and affiliate of Black World Studies at Miami (OH) University. She has written extensively on the politics of race and gender in antiquity and is currently at work on a project examining the role of eugenics in early twentieth-century classical scholarship. In 2012, she published her book Race: Antiquity & Its Legacy, which will be the topic of todays conversation. It accounts for the various ways in which ancient cultures thought about race (including race as social practice and racial representations). We also dig into the "Black Athena" controversy a bit and why the field of Classics handled it so poorly.



Related Articles:

Related Podcast Episodes:
"Special Guest Episode on Classics and Race/Ethnicity w/Rebecca Futo Kennedy"
"'Us' & 'Them' in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 1: The Problem" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 2: The Response" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster


Sunday, August 23, 2020

105 - Carthage Enters the War



In this episode, we discuss the Second Greco-Punic War (410-404 BC), as hostilities between Segesta and Selinus draw both Carthage to Sicily and the Syracusan fleet back from the eastern Aegean and the Hellespont, including Hannibal Mago's first invasion of Sicily and the destruction of Selinus and Himera, the rebellion of the previously exiled Hermocrates, the rise of Dionysius as tyrant of Syracuse, Hannibal Mago's second invasion of Sicily and the destruction of Akragas and Gela, and finally, the war’s ceasefire which would see Carthage and Syracuse (under Dionysius) as the dual hegemons of Sicily


Primary Sources:


Sunday, August 2, 2020

104 - The Democratic Empire Strikes Back




In this episode, we discuss the years 411-410 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the shifting of the naval war to the Hellespont, the vigor that the Athenian democracy at Samos showed in carrying on the war effort against Sparta and Pharnabazos with victories at Cynossema and Cyzicus, the re-establishment of the radical democracy at Athens, and the transition from the historical account of Thucydides into that of Xenophon's Hellenica



Sunday, July 12, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on Greek Naval Warfare w/Marc DeSantis**



We are taking a break from our regularly scheduled programming for another special guest episode in a series where I converse with Classicists and Ancient Historians about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by military historian Marc DeSantis. He is the author of Rome Seizes the Tridenta book about the rise of Republican Rome's naval forces, as well as over 200 published scholarly articles that have appeared in a wide range of international publications including MHQ, Military History, Ancient Warfare, Military History Monthly, History of War, and Ancient History Magazine. In addition to his historical writings, Marc is the author of The Memnon War, a series of science fiction novels, and he teaches English at Saint Peter’s University. 



Marc’s most recent book, "A Naval History of the Peloponnesian War: Ships, Men and Money in the War at Sea, 431-404 BC” will be the topic at hand today. In particular, we talk about ship designs, naval combat, and the financial burden of navies during the Peloponnesian War, as well as the overall war strategies of both sides.



Saturday, June 27, 2020

**Ancient and Renaissance Cities with Ryan Stitt and Ben Jacobs**

This video features a presentation that Ben Jacobs (trained urban planner and host of the Wittenberg of Westphalia Podcast) and Ryan Stitt (trained Ancient Greek and host of The History of Ancient Greece podcast) gave at Intelligent Speech 2020, a virtual conference for podcast producers and consumers. We discuss the form and function of cities in the ancient and early modern worlds.

Sunday, June 21, 2020

103 - An Oligarchic Coup



In this episode, we discuss the years 411-410 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the third and final treaty between the Spartans and Tissaphernes; the comedic plays "Lysistrata" and "Thesmophorizusai" by Aristophanes; how the Athenians succumbed to civil war for the first time in nearly a century and saw an overthrow of their democracy by what is known as the 400; the vicissitudes of this new oligarchic government; and how factionalism between extremists and moderates led to its downfall


Tuesday, June 2, 2020

**Ryan Stitt - The History of Ancient Greece Podcast**

Ryan Stitt - The History of Ancient Greece Podcast talks about his love of Greece and podcasting. Intelligent Speech 2020 will take place online on June 27th 10 am to 6 pm Eastern time. The theme of this year‘s conference is, ‘Hidden Voices’.

Thursday, May 28, 2020

102 - Livin' on a (Persian) Prayer



In this episode, we discuss the years 413-412 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenian response at home to the Sicilian Disaster, the Spartan and Theban devastation of Attic agriculture and commerce from Decelea, the dissolution of the "friendship" between Athens and Persia, the Spartans' building up of a navy and encouraging of revolts of Athenian subject-allies, the shifting of the war to the eastern Aegean, and a series of treaties are made between Sparta and the Persian satrap Tissaphernes

Primary Sources:
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 8)
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)

Sunday, May 17, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on 'Ovid and the Art of Love' w/Esme von Hoffman**



In today's special guest episode, I am joined by director and screenwriter Esme von Hoffman (Festival of Cinema NYC 2019 Winner for Best Director) for her film, Ovid and the Art of Love. Esme and I discuss her background with Classics and Roman history, what drew her to make a film about the life of Ovid, her artistic vision in adapting the film to a modern audience, and some of the decisions that she made in writing its script

Synopsis"A young man, Ovid (Corbin Bleu), finds his life in danger when he writes a provocative guide to love and tangles with the brutal emperor Augustus (John Savage). Based on the life of the famous Roman poet Ovid, this fun, classic story full of adventure, romance, and intrigue gets a modern twist. Set in a mash-up world of contemporary Detroit complete with togas, sneakers, hip-hop, oration, and poetry slams and filmed amidst the Motor City’s classical ruins, graffiti, and burgeoning art scene, Ovid and the Art of Love is cinematically beautiful, engaging, and uncannily relevant."


***The film is available to stream on all major platforms on May 19th 2020***





Esme von Hoffman (Screenwriter / Director)

Corbin Bleu (Ovid)

John Savage (Augustus)

Tamara Feldman (Julia the Younger)

Tara Summers (Julia the Elder)

Sunday, April 26, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on Greek Land Warfare w/Owen Rees**



This is the eighth episode in a series where I converse with Classicists and Ancient Historians about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Owen Rees, a freelance historian, writer and researcher. He studied Ancient History at the University of Reading and History (Research) at the University of Nottingham. He is an assistant editor to “Sparta: Journal of Ancient Spartan and Greek History” and a regular contributor to Ancient Warfare Magazine. He also has published two books on the topic of ancient Greek warfare: Great Battles of the Classical Greek World, and Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World.

On episode 13 of THOAG we previously covered hoplite warfare, but that was four years ago and when I first started the podcast. With four years of experience under my belt and with a bit of hindsight, I don’t feel as if I did the topic it's due (and you will hear why later), and so one day I plan to redo it. Until then, Dr Rees was kind enough to come on to discuss ancient Greek warfare more generally, though we focus specifically on land warfare here, as there will be a future special guest episode just on naval. We go into lengthy discussions on the definition of a hoplite, its socio-political importance, and the problems surrounding its chronology and historiographic tradition. We also discuss the problems with the traditional reconstructive models of ancient Greek battles; the important role of cavalry and light infantry, particularly in the Peloponnesian War onwards; and why the concept of an “honorable western way of war” which seeks its origins in ancient Greek warfare is bogus and hyped up in modern ideology. There are also lots of digression on logistics, slaves, baggage trains, training, the Spartan mirage, the brutal experience of war, the fear that it instilled, and the war dead. Finally, Dr Rees discusses his most recent research (and the topic of his next book) which involves the transition of soldiers from civilian life to the battlefield and back again, including all the psychological and sociological problems that arise from this.


Wednesday, March 18, 2020

101 - Disaster in Sicily



In this episode, we discuss the year 413 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the rise of Archelaus to the Macedonian throne, the Spartan establishment of Decelea, the defeats by the Athenian army and navy at Syracuse, and the retreat and ultimate surrender of the Athenians, which brought the Sicilian Expedition to an end

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 7)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)

Thursday, February 13, 2020

100 - A Sicilian Stalemate



In this episode, we discuss the years 415-414 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenian attempt at blockading Syracuse, the death of Lamachos, the tactical blunders of Nikias, the arrival of Gylippus, and the "Birds" of Aristophanes

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 6)
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 7)
Aristophanes' The Birds
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)

Sunday, January 5, 2020

099 - Frustrations and Poor Decisions


In this episode, we discuss the years 417-415 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the ostracism of Hyperbolus, the rivalry of Nikias and Alcibiades, the siege of Melos, the lead up and first year of the Sicilian Expedition, and the prosecutions for the Hermai and Eleusinian Mysteries scandals

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 5)
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 6)
Andocides' On The Mysteries
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)

Sunday, December 1, 2019

098 - The Peace Unravels


In this episode, we discuss the years 421-418 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the breakdowns of the Peace of Nikias; the rise of Alcibiades to prominence at Athens; the differences that arose between Sparta and some of their dissident allies; the diplomatic maneuverings that resulted in the quadruple alliance between Athens, Argos, Mantinea, and Elis; and the decisive Spartan victory at the Battle of Mantinea

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 5)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)


Sunday, November 10, 2019

**Special Guest Episode on Mesopotamian Medicine w/Moudhy Al-Rashid**



This is the seventh episode in a series where I converse with Classicists (and now Assyriologists) about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Moudhy Al-Rashid, Post-Doc at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom. Her current research focuses on the use of metaphor in descriptions of mental distress in cuneiform medical texts, and she teaches classes on the Akkadian language and the history of science and medicine in ancient Mesopotamia.

Dr Moudhy Al-Rashid
Post-Doc at Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Recommended Articles

Sunday, October 6, 2019

**Special Guest Episode on Classical Monsters and Popular Culture w/Liz Gloyn**



This is the sixth episode in a series where I converse with Classicists about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In this special guest episode, I am joined by Dr. Liz Gloyn, Senior Lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London, in the United Kingdom. Her primary teaching and research areas focus on the intersections between Roman social history, Latin literature, and ancient philosophy (particularly Seneca the younger and his approach to Stoicism and the family unit). This research led her to publish her book, The Ethics of the Family in Seneca. But Dr. Gloyn also has a strong interest in classical reception, particularly the history of women as professional academic classicists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as the classics in popular media, such as film, television, and young adult fiction. 

It’s that last bit that will be the focus of today’s episode, as Dr. Gloyn and I discuss her forthcoming book, Tracking Classical Monsters in Popular Culture (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019).

Tracking Classical Monsters in Popular Culture

This work is the first in-depth study on classical reception and monsters in Anglo-American popular culture from the 1950s to the present day. Throughout the book, Dr. Gloyn reveals the trends behind how we have used the monsters, and develops a broad theory of the ancient monster and its life after antiquity, investigating its relation to gender, genre and space to explore what it is that keeps drawing us back to these mythical beasts and why they have remained such a powerful presence in our shared cultural imagination. Specifically, her book takes us through a comprehensive tour of monsters on film and television, from the much-loved creations of Ray Harryhausen in Clash of the Titans to the monster of the week in Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, before examining in detail the post-classical afterlives of the two most popular monsters, the Medusa and the Minotaur. 

Dr. Liz Gloyn
Senior Lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London
Website: https://lizgloyn.wordpress.com/

Saturday, September 28, 2019

097 - The Road to Peace


In this episode, we discuss the years 423-421 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the death of Artaxerxes and the succession struggle that ends with Darius II on the Persian throne; the continuation of Brasidas' Thracian and Macedonian campaign; the ‘Wasps’ and ‘Peace’ by Aristophanes; and the deaths of Brasidas and Kleon during the second battle of Amphipolis, culminating in the “Peace of Nikias” and the end of the Archidamian War

Primary Sources: 
Aristophanes' The Wasps
Aristophanes' Peace
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 5)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

096 - Athens on the Offensive



In this episode, we discuss the years 425 and 424 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the conclusion of the First Sicilian Expedition and the Congress of Gela, the Athenian seizure of Kythera, the battles of Megara and Delium, and the beginning of Brasidas' Thracian campaign

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 4)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)

Thursday, August 15, 2019

095 - The Greek World Turned Upside Down



In this episode, we discuss the years 426 and 425 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the current nature of Athenian politics as dominated by Kleon the anti-aristocratic demagogue, his feud with Aristophanes as seen in the comedic plays "The Acharnians" and "The Knights", the Battles of Pylos and Sphacteria that turned the Greek world upside down, and the brutal conclusion to the Corcyraean civil war

Primary Sources: 
Aristophanes' The Acharnians
Aristophanes' The Knights
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 4)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

**Special Guest Episode on Being a Modern Homeric Bard w/Joe Goodkin**


In this special guest episode, I am joined by Joe Goodkin, a Chicago-based singer/songwriter, who tours the country performing his one-man folk-opera interpretation of Homer’s Odyssey. He has performed his Odyssey over 290 times in 38 U.S. states and Canada.  Joe's Odyssey is part lecture, part musical performance, and part interactive discussion. The centerpiece of Joe's Odyssey is a 30 minute continuous performance of 24 original songs performed only with an acoustic guitar and voice and with lyrics inspired by Odysseus' famous exploits. 

We talk about how he was able to combine his Bachelor's Degree in Classics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his years as a professional musician to create something extremely unique, and discuss his methodology and his own odyssey towards creating the Odyssey, as well as what it’s like to be a modern bard and how that has shaped his understanding of not only the Homeric poems but the context in which ancient audiences would have experienced the. Then, we discuss his experiences of performing at the NJCL (or National Junior Classical League), which is where we first met, as well as in high schools and at universities, our views on the field of Classics at large, what it means to be “non-traditional” classicists, and what we can do and have been able to do to promote Classics to a general audience and why that is important.


**You can read an article Joe wrote about being a modern bard here.

To inquire about booking a performance of The Odyssey (or anything else) please contact Joe at joe@joesodyssey.com

Friday, June 28, 2019

***Audio Teaching Strategies: Classics at Sound Education 2018**

Greece, Rome, the Ancient Near East, archaeology, and Greek and Latin get a lot of love from the world of educational audio, from hobbyists offering general overviews of ancient wars to linguists teaching you how to scan poetry in archaic Greek. This panel will discuss methods that successful hosts have used to bring specific topics from antiquity to large numbers of listeners. Moderator: Doug Metzger (Literature and History - https://literatureandhistory.com) Rhiannon Evans (Emperors of Rome - https://www.facebook.com/EmperorsofRomePodcast) Zoe Kontes (Looted - http://www.lootedpodcast.org/) Ryan Stitt (The History of Ancient Greece - http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com) Vanya Visnjic (Ancient Greece Declassified - http://greecepodcast.com/) The first-ever Sound Education conference on educational audio took place at Harvard University's Divinity School on November 1-3rd, 2018. Learn more, listen, and celebrate your love of audio with us at: https://www.soundeducation.fm/

Saturday, June 22, 2019

**Special Guest Episode on Translating Thucydides’ Speeches w/Johanna Hanink**



This is the fifth episode in a series where I converse with Classicists about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In this special guest episode, I am joined by Dr. Johanna Hanink, Associate Professor of Classics at Brown University in Providence, RI. Her primary teaching and research areas focus on various aspects of Greek antiquity and its legacy, but she is especially interested in Classical Athens, particularly the cultural life of the city's 4th century BC, and the strange relationships between modern politics and the ancient past. She is active in Brown’s Program in Modern Greek Studies and serves on the editorial boards of The Journal of Modern Greek Studies and EidolonShe is the author and editor of a number of articles and books, including Lycurgan Athens and the Making of Classical Tragedy (Cambridge University Press 2014), Creative Lives in Classical Antiquity: Poets, Artists, and Biography (Cambridge University Press 2016), and The Classical Debt: Greek Antiquity in an Era of Austerity (Harvard University Press 2017), which explores how Western fantasies of classical antiquity have created a particularly fraught relationship between the European West and the country of Greece, especially in the context of Greece's recent "tale of two crises.” Her most recent book, How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy (Princeton University Press, 2019), is the topic of today’s conversation. 

"Why do nations go to war? What are citizens willing to die for? What justifies foreign invasion? And does might always make right? For nearly 2,500 years, students, politicians, political thinkers, and military leaders have read the eloquent and shrewd speeches in Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War for profound insights into military conflict, diplomacy, and the behavior of people and countries in times of crisis. How to Think about War presents the most influential and compelling of these speeches in an elegant new translation by classicist Johanna Hanink, accompanied by an enlightening introduction, informative headnotes, and the original Greek on facing pages. The result is an ideally accessible introduction to Thucydides’s long and challenging History."

I am very excited that Dr. Hanink agreed to come onto THOAG to discuss what it was like to translate Thucydides and the deeper meaning behind many of his speeches.

Sunday, May 26, 2019

094 - New Leaders and New Strategies



In this episode, we discuss the years 427 and 426 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the destruction of Plataea, civil wars in both Megara and Corcyra, and Athenian campaigns in Sicily, central Greece, and northwestern Greece

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 3)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)

Sunday, May 19, 2019

093 - Revolt in the Empire



In this episode, we discuss the years 428 and 427 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the introduction of Kleon and Nikias, the revolt of Mytilene (Lesbos) from the Athenian empire, and a "prison-style breakout" from Plataea

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 3)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)

Sunday, May 12, 2019

092 - The End of an Era (Part II)



In this episode, we discuss the years 430 and 429 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including a failed Spartan invasion of Zakynthos and Acarnania, Phormio's naval victories at Rhium and Naupactus, an Athenian debacle at Spartolos, the end of the siege of Potidaea, the death of Pericles and Phormio, and a Thracian invasion of Macedonia

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 2)
Plutarch's Life of Pericles
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)

Sunday, April 28, 2019

091 - Attrition and Plague




In this episode, we discuss the first year and a half of the war (431-430 BC), as both Sparta and Athens initiated their war strategies, including a Theban sneak attack on Plataea that began the war, Peloponnesian land raids on Attica, Athenian naval raids on the Peloponnese and northwestern Greece, Athenian alliances with Odrysian Thrace, a famous funeral oration by Pericles, and a deadly plague that devastated Athens

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 2)
Plutarch's Life of Pericles
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)