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Thursday, October 22, 2020

106 - Frustrations and Poor Decisions (Part II)

In this episode, we discuss the years 409-406 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenians’ achieving control in the Hellespont and Bosporus, Alcibiades’ triumphant return to Athens, the ascension of Lysander and his bromance with Cyrus, the Athenian defeat at Notium and the disgrace of Alcibiades, Kallikratidas victory over Konon at Mytilene, and the subsequent Battle of Arginusae with its disastrous consequences for the Athenians







Thursday, October 8, 2020

***Special Guest Episode on Classics and White Supremacy w/Curtis Dozier***

In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Curtis Dozier, Assistant Professor of Greek and Roman Studies at Vassar CollegeHe is the producer and host of The Mirror of Antiquity, a podcast featuring classical scholars discussing the intersections of their research, the contemporary world, and their own lives. More importantly to our discussion, He is also the director of Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classicsa website devoted to documenting and responding to appropriations of Ancient Greece and Rome by hate groups online. We discuss some of the reasons how, as well as why, White Supremacists have taken to coopting Classical imagery to support their twisted world views.


Dr Curtis Dozier

Assistant Professor of Greek and Roman Studies at Vassar College

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CurtisDozier and https://twitter.com/pharosclassics




Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classics (@pharosclassics) | Twitter


Related Articles:


Related Podcast Episodes:
"Special Guest Episode on Race, Antiquity, and Its Legacy w/Denise McCoskey"
"'Us' & 'Them' in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 1: The Problem" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 2: The Response" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster


Sunday, September 20, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on Race, Antiquity, and Its Legacy w/Denise McCoskey**



In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Denise Eileen McCoskey, Professor of Classics and affiliate of Black World Studies at Miami (OH) University. She has written extensively on the politics of race and gender in antiquity and is currently at work on a project examining the role of eugenics in early twentieth-century classical scholarship. In 2012, she published her book Race: Antiquity & Its Legacy, which will be the topic of todays conversation. It accounts for the various ways in which ancient cultures thought about race (including race as social practice and racial representations). We also dig into the "Black Athena" controversy a bit and why the field of Classics handled it so poorly.

Dr Denise Eileen McCoskey
Professor of Classics at Miami (OH) University


Dr. Denise McCoskey - Miami University


Related Articles:

Related Podcast Episodes:
"Special Guest Episode on Classics and Race/Ethnicity w/Rebecca Futo Kennedy"
"'Us' & 'Them' in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 1: The Problem" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster
"Race and Racism in Ancient and Medieval Studies, Part 2: The Response" @ The Endless Knot podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster


Sunday, August 23, 2020

105 - Carthage Enters the War



In this episode, we discuss the Second Greco-Punic War (410-404 BC), as hostilities between Segesta and Selinus draw both Carthage to Sicily and the Syracusan fleet back from the eastern Aegean and the Hellespont, including Hannibal Mago's first invasion of Sicily and the destruction of Selinus and Himera, the rebellion of the previously exiled Hermocrates, the rise of Dionysius as tyrant of Syracuse, Hannibal Mago's second invasion of Sicily and the destruction of Akragas and Gela, and finally, the war’s ceasefire which would see Carthage and Syracuse (under Dionysius) as the dual hegemons of Sicily

Primary Sources:





Sunday, August 2, 2020

104 - The Democratic Empire Strikes Back



In this episode, we discuss the years 411-410 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the shifting of the naval war to the Hellespont, the vigor that the Athenian democracy at Samos showed in carrying on the war effort against Sparta and Pharnabazos with victories at Cynossema and Cyzicus, the re-establishment of the radical democracy at Athens, and the transition from the historical account of Thucydides into that of Xenophon's Hellenica






Sunday, July 12, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on Greek Naval Warfare w/Marc DeSantis**



In today's special guest episode, I am joined by military historian Marc DeSantis. He is the author of Rome Seizes the Tridenta book about the rise of Republican Rome's naval forces, as well as over 200 published scholarly articles that have appeared in a wide range of international publications including MHQ, Military History, Ancient Warfare, Military History Monthly, History of War, and Ancient History Magazine. In addition to his historical writings, Marc is the author of The Memnon War, a series of science fiction novels, and he teaches English at Saint Peter’s University. 



Marc’s most recent book, "A Naval History of the Peloponnesian War: Ships, Men and Money in the War at Sea, 431-404 BC” will be the topic at hand today. In particular, we talk about ship designs, naval combat, and the financial burden of navies during the Peloponnesian War, as well as the overall war strategies of both sides.



Sunday, June 21, 2020

103 - An Oligarchic Coup



In this episode, we discuss the years 411-410 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the third and final treaty between the Spartans and Tissaphernes; the comedic plays "Lysistrata" and "Thesmophoriazusai" by Aristophanes; how the Athenians succumbed to civil war for the first time in nearly a century and saw an overthrow of their democracy by what is known as the 400; the vicissitudes of this new oligarchic government; and how factionalism between extremists and moderates led to its downfall






Thursday, May 28, 2020

102 - Livin' on a (Persian) Prayer



In this episode, we discuss the years 413-412 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenian response at home to the Sicilian Disaster, the Spartan and Theban devastation of Attic agriculture and commerce from Decelea, the dissolution of the "friendship" between Athens and Persia, the Spartans' building up of a navy and encouraging of revolts of Athenian subject-allies, the shifting of the war to the eastern Aegean, and a series of treaties are made between Sparta and the Persian satrap Tissaphernes

Primary Sources:
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 8)
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)





Sunday, May 17, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on 'Ovid and the Art of Love' w/Esme von Hoffman**



In today's special guest episode, I am joined by director and screenwriter Esme von Hoffman (Festival of Cinema NYC 2019 Winner for Best Director) for her film, Ovid and the Art of Love. Esme and I discuss her background with Classics and Roman history, what drew her to make a film about the life of Ovid, her artistic vision in adapting the film to a modern audience, and some of the decisions that she made in writing its script

Synopsis"A young man, Ovid (Corbin Bleu), finds his life in danger when he writes a provocative guide to love and tangles with the brutal emperor Augustus (John Savage). Based on the life of the famous Roman poet Ovid, this fun, classic story full of adventure, romance, and intrigue gets a modern twist. Set in a mash-up world of contemporary Detroit complete with togas, sneakers, hip-hop, oration, and poetry slams and filmed amidst the Motor City’s classical ruins, graffiti, and burgeoning art scene, Ovid and the Art of Love is cinematically beautiful, engaging, and uncannily relevant."


***The film is available to stream on all major platforms on May 19th 2020***





Esme von Hoffman (Screenwriter / Director)

Corbin Bleu (Ovid)

John Savage (Augustus)

Tamara Feldman (Julia the Younger)

Tara Summers (Julia the Elder)

Sunday, April 26, 2020

**Special Guest Episode on Greek Land Warfare w/Owen Rees**



In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Owen Rees, a freelance historian, writer and researcher. He studied Ancient History at the University of Reading and History (Research) at the University of Nottingham. He is an assistant editor to “Sparta: Journal of Ancient Spartan and Greek History” and a regular contributor to Ancient Warfare Magazine. He also has published two books on the topic of ancient Greek warfare: Great Battles of the Classical Greek World, and Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World.

On episode 13 of THOAG we previously covered hoplite warfare, but that was four years ago and when I first started the podcast. With four years of experience under my belt and with a bit of hindsight, I don’t feel as if I did the topic it's due (and you will hear why later), and so one day I plan to redo it. Until then, Dr Rees was kind enough to come on to discuss ancient Greek warfare more generally, though we focus specifically on land warfare here, as there will be a future special guest episode just on naval. We go into lengthy discussions on the definition of a hoplite, its socio-political importance, and the problems surrounding its chronology and historiographic tradition. We also discuss the problems with the traditional reconstructive models of ancient Greek battles; the important role of cavalry and light infantry, particularly in the Peloponnesian War onwards; and why the concept of an “honorable western way of war” which seeks its origins in ancient Greek warfare is bogus and hyped up in modern ideology. There are also lots of digression on logistics, slaves, baggage trains, training, the Spartan mirage, the brutal experience of war, the fear that it instilled, and the war dead. Finally, Dr Rees discusses his most recent research (and the topic of his next book) which involves the transition of soldiers from civilian life to the battlefield and back again, including all the psychological and sociological problems that arise from this.


Dr Owen Rees



Wednesday, March 18, 2020

101 - Disaster in Sicily



In this episode, we discuss the year 413 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the rise of Archelaus to the Macedonian throne, the Spartan establishment of Decelea, the defeats by the Athenian army and navy at Syracuse, and the retreat and ultimate surrender of the Athenians, which brought the Sicilian Expedition to an end

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 7)
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)





Thursday, February 13, 2020

100 - A Sicilian Stalemate



In this episode, we discuss the years 415-414 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenian attempt at blockading Syracuse, the death of Lamachos, the tactical blunders of Nikias, the arrival of Gylippus, and the "Birds" of Aristophanes

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 6)
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 7)
Aristophanes' The Birds
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)





Sunday, January 5, 2020

099 - Frustrations and Poor Decisions



In this episode, we discuss the years 417-415 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the ostracism of Hyperbolus, the rivalry of Nikias and Alcibiades, the siege of Melos, the lead up and first year of the Sicilian Expedition, and the prosecutions for the Hermai and Eleusinian Mysteries scandals

Primary Sources: 
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 5)
Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War (Book 6)
Andocides' On The Mysteries
Plutarch's Life of Nikias
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 12)
Diodorus Siculus' The Library of History (Book 13)